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What Is CFD Trading UK & How Does It Work?

Tobi Opeyemi Amure
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What Is CFD Trading & How Does It Work?

In a nutshell, CFD trading in the UK involves speculating on the rising or falling prices of fast-moving global financial markets (like shares, indices, commodities, currencies, and treasuries) using Contracts for Difference (CFDs). It’s a leveraged product, meaning traders can open a position for a mere fraction of the trade’s full value, which can magnify both profits and losses. CFDs are popular among UK investors as they offer opportunities to profit from price movements without owning the underlying assets.

CFD trading, or Contract for Difference trading, is a popular form of financial trading that allows you to speculate on the rising or falling prices of various assets without actually owning them.

My article aims to demystify the concept of CFD trading, explaining how it works, its advantages and disadvantages, and key strategies for success.

Whether you’re a seasoned trader looking to diversify your portfolio or a beginner curious about alternative trading methods, my guide will provide you with the insights you need to understand CFD trading.

This article was reviewed by Tobi Opeyemi Amure, a trading expert and writer at InvestopediaInvesting.com, and Trading.biz.

What Is CFD Trading?

CFD trading, or Contract for Difference trading, is a financial derivative that allows you to speculate on the price movements of various assets without actually owning them.

In a CFD trade, you enter into a contract with a broker to exchange the difference in the price of an asset from the point at which the contract is opened to when it is closed.

This means you can profit from both rising and falling markets. CFDs are commonly used for trading a wide range of financial instruments, including stocks, commodities, currencies, and indices.

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Plus500 - Overall best trading platform
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One of the fastest-growing trading platforms in the UK for CFD trading. Comprehensive for all levels of experience.

Pros:
  • Intuitive, user-friendly platform
  • Demo trading account & learning academy
  • Fast and responsive customer service
  • Trading tools & charts
82% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

How Does CFD Trading Work?

CFD trading works by allowing you to enter into a contract with a broker to exchange the difference in the price of an asset from the time the contract is opened to when it is closed.

Here’s how it generally works:

  1. Opening a Position: You choose an asset and decide whether you think its price will rise or fall. If you expect the price to rise, you go ‘long’ (buy); if you expect it to fall, you go ‘short’ (sell).
  2. Leverage: CFD trading is often leveraged, meaning you only need to deposit a small percentage of the total trade value, known as the margin. This amplifies both potential profits and potential losses.
  3. Trade Execution: Once you’ve decided on your position, you execute the trade through a trading platform provided by your broker.
  4. Monitoring: After the trade is open, you’ll need to monitor the asset’s price movement and may use tools like stop-loss or take-profit orders to manage risks.
  5. Closing the Position: To close a CFD position, you execute an opposite trade to the one that opened the position. If you initially went long, you would go short to close, and vice versa.
  6. Profit or Loss: The profit or loss is determined by the difference in price between when the contract was opened and when it was closed, multiplied by the number of CFD units. If you went long and the asset’s price rose, or if you went short and the price fell, you’ll make a profit. Otherwise, you’ll incur a loss.
  7. Costs: There are various costs associated with CFD trading, such as spread costs, overnight holding costs (swap fees), and any applicable commissions.
  8. Settlement: Unlike traditional trading, there’s no physical exchange of assets in CFD trading. All transactions are settled in cash.

CFD Trading Essentials

Here are some key essential characteristics of CFDs.

1. You Can Go Long or Short with CFDs

One of the most appealing aspects of CFD trading is the ability to profit from both rising and falling markets. When you go ‘long,’ you are buying the CFD with the expectation that the asset’s price will rise.

Conversely, when you go ‘short,’ you are selling the CFD, anticipating a decrease in the asset’s price.

Example: Let’s say you believe that the stock of Company A, currently priced at £100, will rise. You go long and buy 10 CFDs. If the stock price rises to £110, you would make a profit of £10 per CFD, totaling £100. On the other hand, if you believe the stock price will fall, you could go short and sell 10 CFDs. If the stock price drops to £90, you would also make a £100 profit.

2. CFD Trading Is Leveraged

Leverage allows you to control a large position with a relatively small amount of capital, known as the margin.

While leverage can amplify your profits, it also increases the potential for significant losses, including the possibility of losing more than your initial investment.

Example: Suppose you want to trade CFDs on Company B’s stock, which is priced at £50. With a leverage of 10:1, you could control a position of 100 shares (worth £5,000) with just £500. If the stock price rises to £55, your profit would be £500 (100 shares x £5), effectively doubling your initial margin. However, if the stock price falls to £45, you would lose £500, wiping out your initial margin.

3. CFDs Behave Similarly to Their Underlying Market

The price of a CFD closely tracks the price of the underlying asset, whether it’s a stock, commodity, currency, or index. This means that any news, events, or economic indicators that affect the asset will similarly impact the CFD.

Example: If you’re trading a CFD based on an oil commodity and there’s news of a significant oil discovery, the price of oil is likely to rise. Consequently, the CFD based on oil would also see a price increase. Similarly, if you’re trading a CFD on a stock market index and the central bank announces a change in interest rates, the index is likely to react, and so will the corresponding CFD.

Understanding these three essentials—going long or short, the impact of leverage, and the behavior of CFDs in relation to their underlying market—can provide you with a solid foundation for successful CFD trading.

Always remember to use risk management strategies to mitigate potential losses.

Risk Management Strategies for CFD Trading

Risk management is crucial in CFD trading, especially given the leveraged nature of these financial instruments.

Here are some key risk management strategies to consider:

1. Use Stop-Loss Orders

A stop-loss order automatically closes your position if the asset reaches a certain price, limiting your losses. For example, if you go long on a stock at £100 per share, you can set a stop-loss at £95. If the stock falls to this price, the position will automatically close, limiting your loss.

2. Set Take-Profit Levels

Similar to a stop-loss, a take-profit order automatically closes your position once the asset reaches a predetermined price level, securing your gains. If you go long on a stock at £100 and set a take-profit at £110, the trade will close automatically when the stock reaches £110, ensuring you make a profit.

3. Diversify Your Portfolio

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Diversifying across different asset classes or sectors can help mitigate risks. If one asset performs poorly, the loss can be offset by gains in another.

4. Use Leverage Wisely

While leverage can amplify gains, it also increases the potential for significant losses. Make sure you understand the level of leverage you are using and are comfortable with the associated risks.

5. Monitor Margin Requirements

Keep an eye on your margin levels. If a trade moves against you, you may need to deposit additional funds to keep the position open. Failing to do so could result in a margin call and the closing of your position at a loss.

6. Keep Up with Market News

Economic indicators, company news, and geopolitical events can all affect market conditions. Staying informed will help you anticipate price movements and adjust your strategies accordingly.

7. Use Risk/Reward Ratios

Before entering a trade, assess the potential risk and reward. A common strategy is to aim for trades with a risk/reward ratio of at least 1:2, meaning the potential profit should be at least twice the potential loss.

8. Limit Exposure

Only invest money that you can afford to lose. A good rule of thumb is to limit the risk on any single trade to a small percentage of your total trading capital, often cited as 1-2%.

9. Test Strategies with Demo Accounts

Many brokers offer demo trading accounts where you can practice trading with virtual funds. This allows you to test your strategies and get comfortable with the trading platform without risking real money.

10. Continuous Learning

Markets are dynamic, and continuous learning is essential for long-term success. Keep updating your knowledge and adapting your strategies to stay ahead of the game.

By implementing these risk management strategies, you can better navigate the complexities and risks associated with CFD trading.

CFD Trading Example

Let’s go through a simple example to illustrate how CFD trading works:

Asset: Company XYZ Stock

  • Current Stock Price: £50 per share
  • Leverage: 10:1
  • Initial Margin Requirement: 10% of the total trade value

Scenario: Going Long (Buying)

You believe that the stock price of Company XYZ will rise shortly. You decide to go long and buy CFDs equivalent to 100 shares of Company XYZ.

  1. Trade Value: 100 shares x £50 per share = £5,000
  2. Initial Margin: 10% of £5,000 = £500 (This is the amount you need to open the position)

Outcome 1: Stock Price Rises

  • The stock price rises to £55.
  • Profit per share: £55 – £50 = £5
  • Total Profit: £5 x 100 shares = £500

In this case, you’ve effectively doubled your initial margin of £500.

Outcome 2: Stock Price Falls

  • The stock price drops to £45.
  • Loss per share: £50 – £45 = £5
  • Total Loss: £5 x 100 shares = £500

Here, you’ve lost your initial margin of £500.

Additional Costs

Don’t forget to account for trading costs such as the spread (difference between the buy and sell price), overnight holding costs if applicable, and any commissions charged by the broker.

Risk Management

To mitigate potential losses, you could set a stop-loss order. For example, you might set a stop-loss at £48. If the stock price falls to this level, the CFD position will automatically close, limiting your loss to £200 (£2 loss per share x 100 shares).

This example illustrates the basic mechanics of CFD trading, including the potential for both profit and loss, as well as the importance of risk management strategies like using stop-loss orders.

What Assets Can You Trade With CFDs?

CFD (Contract for Difference) trading offers the opportunity to speculate on a wide range of financial assets without owning the underlying instrument. Here are some of the most commonly traded assets in CFD trading:

1. Stocks and Shares

Trade CFDs on individual company stocks from various stock exchanges around the world, such as the NYSE, NASDAQ, LSE, and more.

2. Indices

Speculate on the price movements of major stock market indices like the S&P 500, FTSE 100, DAX 30, and others.

3. Forex (Foreign Exchange)

Trade currency pairs like EUR/USD, GBP/USD, USD/JPY, and many more. Forex markets are open 24/5, offering continuous trading opportunities.

4. Commodities

Trade CFDs on physical goods like gold, silver, oil, natural gas, and agricultural products like wheat, coffee, and sugar.

5. Cryptocurrencies

Speculate on the price movements of popular cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, and Litecoin.

6. Bonds and Interest Rates

Trade on the price movements of government or corporate bonds and interest rate futures.

7. ETFs (Exchange-Traded Funds)

Trade CFDs on baskets of assets that track indices, commodities, or sectors, offering a way to diversify your portfolio.

8. Sectors and Industries

Some platforms offer CFDs that allow you to speculate on the performance of specific sectors or industries, such as technology, healthcare, or energy.

9. Options and Derivatives

Some advanced platforms offer CFDs on options contracts, allowing you to speculate on the price movements of the options themselves.

10. Custom or Exotic Assets

Some brokers offer unique or custom CFDs based on specific events, like political outcomes or economic indicators.

The wide range of assets available for CFD trading allows for significant portfolio diversification and the opportunity to trade in different market conditions. However, it’s crucial to understand the risks associated with each asset type and to conduct thorough research before trading.

Why Do People Trade CFDs?

People trade CFDs (Contracts for Difference) for a variety of reasons, chief among them being the flexibility and opportunities for profit that these financial instruments offer. CFDs allow traders to speculate on the price movements of a wide range of assets, including stocks, commodities, currencies, and indices, without actually owning the underlying asset.

This means traders can benefit from both rising and falling markets by going long or short. Additionally, CFD trading is often leveraged, enabling traders to control a larger position with a smaller amount of capital, thereby amplifying potential profits (as well as risks).

The ability to trade on margin, coupled with the convenience of trading multiple asset classes through a single platform, makes CFDs an attractive option for those looking to diversify their portfolios and capitalise on short-term market fluctuations.

Moreover, CFDs offer features like stop-loss and take-profit orders, which help in better risk management.

Can You Make a Living From CFD Trading?

Making a living from CFD trading is possible, but it’s far from guaranteed and involves significant risks. CFDs are complex financial instruments that offer leverage, meaning you can control a large position with a relatively small amount of capital.

While this can amplify profits, it also magnifies losses, including the potential to lose more than your initial investment.

Successful CFD trading requires a deep understanding of the markets, a well-thought-out trading plan, strict discipline, and effective risk management strategies.

Even experienced traders can face periods of losses, and the high volatility often associated with CFDs can make it challenging to sustain a stable income solely from trading.

Therefore, if you’re considering making a living from CFD trading, it’s crucial to gain substantial experience, continually educate yourself, and be prepared both financially and emotionally for the ups and downs that come with it.

Costs When Trading CFDs

When trading CFDs, there are several types of costs that traders should be aware of:

1. Spread Costs

The spread is the difference between the buy (ask) and sell (bid) price of an asset. The cost of the spread is essentially the broker’s fee for executing the trade. For example, if the buy price is £101 and the sell price is £100, the spread is £1.

2. Commission Fees

Some brokers charge a commission for each trade. This is usually a fixed fee or a percentage of the total trade value. Always check the broker’s fee structure to understand what you’ll be charged.

3. Overnight Holding Costs (Swap Fees)

If you keep a position open overnight, you may be charged an overnight holding fee, also known as a swap fee. This is particularly important for traders who engage in swing trading or long-term trading.

4. Leverage Costs

While leverage allows you to control a large position with a small amount of capital, it can also amplify losses. Some brokers charge a fee for providing leverage, especially if you hold a position for an extended period.

5. Inactivity Fees

Some brokers charge a fee if your account remains inactive for a certain period. Make sure to read the terms and conditions to avoid unexpected charges.

6. Withdrawal Fees

Some brokers may charge fees for withdrawing funds from your trading account, especially if you’re using certain payment methods or withdrawing below a minimum amount.

7. Currency Conversion Fees

If you’re trading assets in a different currency, you may incur currency conversion fees. These are usually a percentage of the trade value and can add up quickly if you’re making multiple trades.

8. Market Data Fees

Some platforms charge fees for real-time market data, advanced charting tools, or premium research reports.

Understanding all the potential costs involved in CFD trading is crucial for effective risk management and profitability. Always read the terms and conditions and fee disclosures of your chosen broker carefully.

Advantages of CFDs

CFD trading offers several advantages that attract both novice and experienced traders.

Here are some of the key benefits:

1. Flexibility to Go Long or Short

One of the most appealing aspects of CFD trading is the ability to profit from both rising and falling markets. You can go long if you anticipate an asset’s price will rise, or go short if you expect it to fall.

2. Access to a Wide Range of Markets

CFDs allow you to trade a variety of financial instruments, including stocks, commodities, currencies, indices, and even cryptocurrencies, all from a single trading platform.

3. Leverage

Leverage enables you to control a large position with a relatively small amount of capital. This amplifies your potential profits, although it also increases the risk of significant losses.

4. Lower Entry Costs

Many CFD brokers offer low or even zero commissions, and the initial capital required to open an account is often minimal. This makes CFD trading accessible to individual retail traders.

5. No Ownership of Underlying Asset

Since you’re not actually owning the asset you’re trading, there’s no need to worry about the responsibilities that come with ownership, such as storage costs for commodities or shareholder responsibilities for stocks.

6. Hedging Opportunities

CFDs can be used to hedge against losses in other investment portfolios. For example, if you own a stock that you expect to decline in the short term, you could go short on a CFD for that stock to offset potential losses.

7. Advanced Trading Tools

Many CFD platforms offer advanced trading tools, such as stop-loss and take-profit options, which can help you manage your risks more effectively.

8. 24-Hour Trading

Certain markets, like forex and cryptocurrencies, are open 24/7, allowing you to trade at any time that suits you, including outside of traditional trading hours.

9. No Stamp Duty

In some jurisdictions, trading CFDs is not subject to stamp duty, which can result in cost savings compared to traditional share trading.

10. Real-time Market Access

CFD platforms often provide real-time market data, news feeds, and analytical tools, helping you make informed trading decisions.

While CFDs offer numerous advantages, they are complex financial instruments that come with a high risk of losing money. It’s crucial to understand the risks involved and consider your investment objectives and level of experience before engaging in CFD trading.

Disadvantages of CFDs

While CFDs offer several advantages, they also come with their own set of drawbacks and risks. Here are some of the key disadvantages to consider:

1. Leverage Risks

While leverage can amplify profits, it also magnifies losses, including the potential to lose more than your initial investment. High leverage can quickly result in significant financial losses.

2. No Ownership Rights

Since you don’t own the underlying asset when trading CFDs, you miss out on certain benefits like voting rights or dividends (unless a dividend adjustment is made to the CFD).

3. Costs and Fees

Though many brokers advertise low or zero commissions, the costs can add up through spreads, overnight holding fees (swap rates), and other administrative charges.

4. Complexity and Skill Requirement

CFD trading requires a good understanding of the markets and trading strategies. It’s not recommended for inexperienced traders without proper education and risk management skills.

5. Regulatory Risks

CFD trading is not permitted in some countries and is generally less regulated than traditional stock markets, which can increase the risk of fraud or unfair practices.

6. Market Risk

CFDs are subject to market risks, including volatility and liquidity risks, which can affect the asset’s price and, consequently, your profit or loss.

7. Overtrading

The ease and low cost of trading CFDs can lead to overtrading, where traders make excessive trades to capitalise on small price movements, often neglecting trading costs and risks.

8. No Long-term Investment

CFDs are generally not suitable for long-term investment due to the costs associated with holding positions for an extended period.

9. Tax Implications

In some jurisdictions, profits from CFD trading may be subject to capital gains tax, and the tax treatment may differ from that of traditional investments.

10. Psychological Factors

The fast-paced nature of CFD trading can be stressful and emotionally draining, requiring a disciplined mindset to avoid impulsive decisions.

Yes, CFD (Contract for Difference) trading is legal in the United Kingdom and is regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). The FCA sets guidelines and standards to ensure that CFD trading platforms operate transparently and fairly.

However, due to the high risks associated with CFD trading, the FCA has imposed several restrictions to protect retail investors.

These include limiting the leverage that can be offered to retail clients, providing clear risk warnings, and ensuring that clients cannot lose more money than they have deposited into their trading account.

It’s important to note that CFD trading is not suitable for everyone due to its complex nature and the high risk of losing money.

Therefore, if you’re considering trading CFDs, make sure to use a platform that is FCA-regulated, understand the risks involved, and consider seeking advice from financial professionals.

Do You Pay Tax on CFDs UK?

I’m not a tax advisor, but in the United Kingdom, the tax implications of CFD (Contract for Difference) trading can be complex and depend on individual circumstances.

Generally, profits from CFD trading are subject to Capital Gains Tax (CGT), and you are required to report these gains on your annual tax return. However, losses from CFD trading can be offset against other capital gains to reduce your tax liability.

It’s worth noting that CFD trading is not subject to stamp duty in the UK, unlike traditional share trading, which can result in cost savings.

Additionally, if you’re trading CFDs as a primary source of income, you may be considered a professional trader by HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC), and your profits could be subject to Income Tax instead of Capital Gains Tax. In such cases, you might also be able to deduct trading-related expenses.

Given the complexity of tax laws and the potential for individual circumstances to affect tax liability, it’s strongly recommended to consult a qualified tax advisor to understand the specific tax implications of CFD trading for you.

Risks of CFD trading

CFD trading comes with a range of risks that traders should be aware of before engaging in this type of investment.

Here are some of the key risks:

1. Leverage Risk

Leverage allows you to control a large position with a small amount of capital. While this can amplify profits, it also magnifies losses, including the potential to lose more than your initial investment.

2. Market Risk

Also known as systematic risk, this is the risk associated with the entire market, rather than a particular stock or industry. Factors like economic downturns, political instability, or major financial disruptions can affect your CFD positions.

3. Liquidity Risk

In some cases, you may not be able to enter or exit a trade at the price you desire due to a lack of buyers or sellers. This is particularly relevant for CFDs on less popular or more volatile assets.

4. Interest Rate Risk

If you hold a position open for an extended period, you may be subject to overnight financing charges, which can eat into your profits or exacerbate your losses.

5. Regulatory Risk

CFD trading is banned or restricted in some jurisdictions, and the regulatory environment can change, affecting your ability to trade.

6. Counterparty Risk

Also known as credit risk, this is the risk that the broker facilitating the CFD may default on their obligations. Trading with a reputable, regulated broker can mitigate this risk.

7. Overtrading

The ease and low initial capital requirements can lead to overtrading, where the trader exposes themselves to excessive risk.

8. Complexity and Skill Risk

CFD trading is complex and requires a deep understanding of the markets and a well-thought-out trading strategy. Inexperience and lack of knowledge can result in significant losses.

9. Emotional Risks

The high-stress, fast-paced nature of CFD trading can lead to poor decision-making driven by emotions like fear and greed.

10. Tax Risks

The tax implications of CFD trading can be complex and vary by jurisdiction. Failure to properly account for tax obligations can result in financial penalties.

Understanding these risks is crucial for anyone considering CFD trading.

Risk management strategies, such as using stop-loss orders, setting proper leverage levels, and diversifying your portfolio, can help mitigate these risks.

Always trade with money you can afford to lose and consider seeking advice from financial professionals.

Is CFD Trading High Risk?

Yes, CFD (Contract for Difference) trading is considered high risk due to several factors. The use of leverage allows traders to control a large position with a relatively small amount of capital, which can amplify both profits and losses.

This means that it’s possible to lose more money than you initially invested. Market volatility can also lead to rapid and significant losses.

Additionally, the complexity of CFD instruments requires a deep understanding of the markets and a well-thought-out trading strategy. Inexperience and lack of knowledge can result in substantial financial losses.

Furthermore, the costs associated with trading, such as spreads and overnight fees, can quickly add up, affecting profitability.

Is CFD Trading Good for Beginners?

CFD trading is generally not recommended for beginners due to its complex and high-risk nature. The use of leverage can amplify both gains and losses, making it possible for traders to lose more than their initial investment.

The markets for CFDs can be highly volatile, and without a solid understanding of market behavior and a well-defined trading strategy, beginners are at a high risk of incurring significant losses. Additionally, the costs associated with CFD trading, such as spreads and overnight holding fees, can be confusing for those new to trading.

While many online platforms offer educational resources and demo accounts to practice trading, the risks involved in CFD trading make it a challenging starting point for those new to investing. Beginners must educate themselves thoroughly and consider starting with less risky investment options before venturing into CFD trading.

CFD Trading Basics – Final Thoughts

CFD trading offers a versatile and potentially lucrative avenue for financial speculation, but it comes with its own set of complexities and risks.

From the ability to trade on margin to the wide range of assets available, CFDs provide opportunities for both profit and loss.

Whether you’re a seasoned trader or a beginner, understanding the mechanics, costs, and risks involved in CFD trading is crucial for success.

Employing effective risk management strategies and continually educating yourself can go a long way in turning the odds in your favor.

Always remember, the high-risk nature of CFDs means they may not be suitable for all investors.

Top pick
Plus500 - Overall best trading platform
4.5

One of the fastest-growing trading platforms in the UK for CFD trading. Comprehensive for all levels of experience.

Pros:
  • Intuitive, user-friendly platform
  • Demo trading account & learning academy
  • Fast and responsive customer service
  • Trading tools & charts
82% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

FAQs

Is CFD trading gambling?

CFD trading is not gambling when approached with a disciplined strategy, thorough analysis, and effective risk management. However, the high-risk nature and use of leverage can make it resemble gambling if traded impulsively or without adequate knowledge. It’s crucial to differentiate between informed trading and speculative betting to understand the risks involved.

Is CFD better than stock?

CFDs and stocks serve different investment needs and come with their own sets of advantages and disadvantages. CFDs offer the flexibility to profit from both rising and falling markets and come with leverage, but they also carry higher risks and costs like overnight fees. Stocks offer ownership and potential dividends but cannot profit from declining markets unless short-selling is involved. Therefore, whether CFDs are “better” than stocks depends on your investment goals, risk tolerance, and trading strategy.

Is CFD trading halal?

The permissibility of CFD trading in Islamic finance is a subject of debate among scholars. Traditional CFD trading involves leverage and overnight interest fees, which are not compliant with Shariah law prohibiting Riba (interest). However, some brokers offer “Islamic” or “Shariah-compliant” CFD accounts that eliminate overnight fees, but the acceptability of these accounts in Islamic finance varies among scholars and religious authorities.

Why do most CFD traders lose money?

Most CFD traders lose money due to a combination of factors such as poor risk management, lack of a well-defined trading strategy, and the use of excessive leverage, which amplifies losses. Additionally, the complexity of CFD instruments and market volatility can make it challenging for traders, especially beginners, to consistently make profitable decisions. Emotional trading and lack of discipline also contribute to losses in CFD trading.

Can you make money with CFDs?

Yes, it is possible to make money with CFDs through accurate market predictions, effective risk management, and a disciplined trading strategy. However, the high-risk nature of CFD trading and the use of leverage also mean that you can incur significant losses, including the potential to lose more than your initial investment. Therefore, CFD trading is not suitable for everyone and should be approached with caution and adequate preparation.

How long can you hold CFDs for?

The length of time you can hold a CFD position depends on the specific contract and broker’s terms. While some CFDs have expiry dates, many are open-ended, allowing you to hold the position as long as you can cover the financing costs, also known as the overnight holding or swap fees, which are charged for keeping the position open. It’s important to check the terms and conditions of your CFD contract to understand any time limitations or associated costs.

How much money do I need to trade CFDs?

The minimum amount required to trade CFDs varies by broker and the asset being traded. Some brokers allow you to start trading with as little as $100 or even less, but it’s important to consider that trading with a small amount of capital limits your ability to manage risks effectively, especially when using leverage. Always ensure you are trading with money you can afford to lose and take into account the costs like spreads and overnight fees.

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Will Fenton is the founder of Sterling Savvy. He is a personal finance expert and writes about trading, investing, budgeting, and other financial topics.

Along with his education in Economics & Finance, he has experience working in the financial services industry in London working for one of the UK’s leading financial companies, “a trustworthy and respected provider of news, education and market analysis for the everyday investor”.

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